what flowers can guinea pigs eat?

What Flowers Can Guinea Pigs Eat? A Full List

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What flowers can guinea pigs eat? With all the conflicting answers to different flowers, I spent a whole week researching and compiling a huge list of safe flowers for Guinea pigs. Not only that, you’ll see the scientific name, summary, which parts of the flower are safe, AND the sources of the information.

As with all of these flowers and plants, here are some things to keep in mind to make sure your guinea pigs can enjoy these plants safely. Because if they overconsume certain plants or eat toxic flowers, they can die.

  1. If you’re not sure if a plant or part of the plant is safe for your guinea pigs, it’s best not to feed it to them and instead ask your vet.
  2. Where you choose to plant or pick the flower is important. Make sure they are free from pesticides and other chemicals
  3. Slowly and gradually introduce the plant to your guinea pig, and feed the plants in small or moderate amounts. These plants should be considered treats instead of all vegetables.

You may also like: Can guinea pigs eat oat grass?

All the information about these flowers/weeds/plants are cited, if there’s anything you want to add or correct, please comment down below and I’ll change it.

Okay, let’s get into it.

Asiatic dayflower (Commelina communis)

Asiatic dayflowers are safe for guinea pigs. These small plants have bright blue, three-petaled flowers and you can often find them in moist, shaded areas. They’re edible and can be a good occasional treat for guinea pigs.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Guinealynx

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

A lot of guinea pigs like eating basil flowers, leaves, and stems. They’re a popular herb known for its pleasant scent, after all.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Guinea Pig Tube

Bee Balm (Monarda spp.)

Bee Balm is safe for guinea pigs. It has beautiful, fragrant flowers that can be red, pink, purple, or white. The leaves and flowers are both edible.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Happy Cavy

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

black ege susan

Black-eyed Susan is safe for guinea pigs to eat, but it’s not particularly tasty. It’s a daisy-like wildflower with a dark center. Other common names for this flower include brown-eyed Susan, brown betty and gloriosa daisy. Keep in mind that you should only feed it in small amounts because too much can cause indigestion.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers. But it’s generally recommended to avoid offering the stems altogether.

Source: According to RSPCA

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) for guinea pigs

Calendula, or pot marigold, is safe for guinea pigs. It has bright orange or yellow flowers and it’s known for its soothing properties.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers (petals)

Source: According to Woodgreen

Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Hepper

Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Chickweed is safe for guinea pigs and is a common weed with small, white, star-like flowers. It’s nutritious and most guinea pigs love them.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Kavee

Cleaver (Galium aparine)

Cleavers are safe for guinea pigs. They’re known for their sticky stems and small, white flowers. The leaves are more popular among guinea pigs because they taste better and have more nutritional value.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Hepper

Clover (Trifolium) – Red and White

Both red and white clover leaves, flowers and stems are safe for guinea pigs, and that’s good news, considering how common they are in North America. While clovers are nutritious, too much can cause bloating, so serve them sparingly.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Hepper and Kavee

Coneflower (Echinacea spp.) 

Coneflowers are safe for guinea pigs. These have large, showy purple or pink flowers with a spiky center. But overconsumption can lead to an upset stomach, so only feed coneflowers in small amounts to your piggies.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Feed My Paws and HayPigs

Blue Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Blue cornflowers are safe for guinea pigs. They have striking blue petals and are sometimes used as ornamental plants.

Safe parts to eat: flowers, N/A

Source: According to Nibble and Gnaw and Burges pet care

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) 

dandelions for guinea pigs, can guinea pigs eat dandelions

It is a common weed with a bright yellow flower head that turns into a white puffball. Guinea pigs eat the flowers, leaves and stems of dandelions, but not the pappus, which is the white fluff that comes after the yellow flowers. Keep in mind that this weed has a high amount of calcium, and high amounts of that can cause bladder stones.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to I C Cinnamon

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel is a popular herb and weed that guinea pigs enjoy. The entire plant, including the bulb, leaves, and seeds, can be eaten by guinea pigs.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers, bulb

Source: According to my pet guinea pig and Guinea Piggies

Forget-me-not (Myosotis spp.)

Forget-me-not is safe for guinea pigs, and it’s a small flowering plant with blue, pink or white flowers. They grow in clusters and you can see them in gardens and parks naturally.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Bunny Meadow

Wild Geranium / Cranesbill (Geranium maculatumL.)

Wild geraniums, also known as cranesbills, are safe for guinea pigs. They have pink to purple flowers and are often found in woodlands and meadows.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Kavee

Hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale)

Hedge mustard is safe for guinea pigs and has small yellow flowers. It’s a common weed that grows in disturbed soils and along roadsides.

Safe parts to eat: flowers, N/A

Source: According to Happy Cavy and Guinea Pig Tube

Hibiscus flowers (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)

Hibiscus flowers are safe for guinea pigs. These large, colourful blooms are a favourite treat for their sweet flavour.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Nibble and Gnaw and Burges Pet Care

Lavender (Lavandula spp.)

It smells amazing, and lavender is safe for your guinea pigs in small amounts. It can even help calm their nerves—think of it as guinea pig aromatherapy. The flowers and leaves are safe, with a slightly bitter taste. It’s great for stress relief, but too much can lead to digestive upset, so offer it as an occasional treat.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Hepper and Pets on Mom

Linden Tree Flowers (Tilia spp.)

Linden tree flowers are safe for guinea pigs to eat. These small, fragrant flowers grow in clusters and are often used in herbal teas.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Small Pet Select

Mallow (Malva sylvestris)

The leaves, flowers, and stems of mallow flowers are edible for guinea pigs. They come in pink or purple flowers.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Kavee

Marigold ((Tagetes erecta Linn.)

Marigold is a popular flower that guinea pigs, rabbits, chinchillas and other small animals love to eat. They do have a slightly bitter taste but that can help with digestion and even act as a natural anti-inflammatory. However, it’s said that the Marsh marigold (Caltha palustris) should be avoided. 

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Cornell CALS and GuineaDad

Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)

Nasturtiums are safe for guinea pigs. They have brightly coloured flowers and peppery-tasting leaves. However, it’s one of those flowers on this list that can cause indigestion if eaten too much.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to RSPCA and Kavee

Oxalis/Wood Sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)

Oxalis, or wood sorrel, is safe for guinea pigs in small amounts. It has small yellow flowers and clover-like leaves. But, they’re high in oxalic acid, which can interfere with calcium absorption if fed in large quantities. That means that too much can lead to bladder stones in your guinea pigs.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Guinea Lynx

Petunias (Petunia x hybrida)

Guinea pigs can guinea Petunias, and it has a sweet taste to it. They are common in South America and can attract pollinators like butterflies too.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Guinea Pig Tube and HappyCavy

Raspberry Leaves (Rubus idaeus) 

Raspberry flowers, stems and leaves are safe for your guinea pigs. In fact, the leaves can help ease diarrhea in guinea pigs and are helpful for pregnant piggies.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to GuineaDad and Hepper

Rose and Rose Hip (Rosa spp.)

Roses and their hips are excellent for guinea pigs. The petals, leaves, and rose hips are all safe to eat. Rose hips, in particular, are rich in Vitamin C.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to GuineaDad and Hepper

Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus)

Rosemary is suitable for guinea pigs and is a woody herb with fragrant, needle-like leaves. It has lots of nutrients but has a stone scent and can be hard for your guinea pig to digest. That’s why it’s important to gradually introduce it to your piggy.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves (but chop it into smaller pieces for it to be easier to eat), flowers

Source: According to Hepper

Shepherd Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)

Shepherd’s Purse is a safe and nutritious option for guinea pigs. This plant has small, white flowers and heart-shaped seed pods.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Kavee

Silverweed (Potentilla anserina)

Silverweed is beneficial for guinea pigs, providing essential nutrients. This weed has yellow flowers and silver-green leaves.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Guinea Pig Magazine

Smooth sow thistle (Sonchus oleraceus)

Smooth sow thistle is a great addition to a guinea pig’s diet. It has yellow dandelion-like flowers and is highly nutritious.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Guinea Pig Tube and Guinea Pig Magazine

Squash Blossoms (Cucurbita spp.)

Squash blossoms are a tasty and safe treat for guinea pigs. These flowers come from squash plants and are usually yellow or orange.

Safe parts to eat: flowers

Source: According to Happy Cavy

Parsley (cow) (Anthriscus sylvestris)

Guinea pigs can eat parsley flowers, stems, and leaves. However, it has high amounts of calcium, so feed it in moderation.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Kavee

Pansies (Viola tricolor)

Pansies are a safe and colourful treat for guinea pigs and rabbits. These flowers come in a variety of colours and are commonly found in gardens.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Bunny Meadow

Violet (Viola spp.)

 Violets have a sweet and floral scent, and guinea pigs love it. The plant comes in many colours, such as blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, and yellow.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, flowers

Source: According to Bunny Meadow

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow is another safe option for guinea pigs. This plant has feathery leaves and clusters of small, white or pink flowers. Keep in mind that overfeeding can cause mild digestive issues, so it’s best given in moderation.

Safe parts to eat: Leaves, stems, flowers

Source: According to Kavee and Hepper

Conclusion 

So there you have it, a full list of flowers guinea pigs can eat. Remember to always ask your vet if you’re not sure what plants or flowers are safe for guinea pigs. 

Keep in mind that flowers should be an occasional food for your guinea pigs, and it doesn’t substitute vegetables like cauliflowers and bell peppers entirely.

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